Security Forces

The Stance of the Democratic Workers Party on the Parliamentary Elections

The Democratic Workers Party has followed with keen interest the current political and social position during the call for parliamentary elections, beginning with a reading of the state of the Egyptian revolution’s track and developments of social conflict on the ground. The party has specified its political program in the following points.

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The Crisis of Human Rights in Egypt

On 19 November 2011, Egyptians again went out into Egypt’s streets and squares to demonstrate peacefully. The demonstrators were demanding a truly democratic, civilian state, similar to what they had dreamed of in January. Soldiers of the police and soldiers of the Armed Forces met them with excessive force, which led to the death of dozens of Egyptians and the injury of more than 3,000 peaceful, unarmed demonstrators.

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Statement 2: Refusing the Speech of the Field Marshall

The occupiers in Tahrir Square announce their complete refusal of what was stated in the Field Marshall Tantawi’s speech with regard to the solution to the current crisis. They affirm that they feel deeply insulted by the audacity of the regime to propose only partial solutions with regard to the fall of the martyrs, by the absence from the speech of any apology for what occurred—or earnest discussion of it, or any clear promise to punish the responsible parties.

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Insurrection in the Ranks of the Central Security in Alexandria

The central security division in the inner western area of Alexandria witnessed an insurrection among the soldiers Sunday night because of one of the division officers’ excesses against a recruit.

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State Security, Not Reconciliation

 

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Third Statement of the People’s Revolution

It may seem like the many events took place in the last few days were a coincidence. All of them, however, have to be analyzed, their lessons extracted, and critical procedures concerning them adopted. We relate several of these as follows:

—The judiciary exonerated the security agencies and released the officers and assistants to the current Minister of the Interior involved in the killing of demonstrators. This prompted the families of the martyrs to attack the courthouse.

—Workers celebrated their holiday in Tahrir Square without government representatives present, and at the same time the figureheads of the worker’s union celebrate the deposed regime with representatives of the Supreme Council, even without the previous system’s usual declaration a holiday bonus for the workers.

—The return of the State Security Service (after being disgraced nationally) to work with the same old methods, standards, and leaders.

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Solving the Problem of 80 Million Egyptians

One individual from the Military Council declared that he received an order from Mubarak to level Tahrir Square along with all of the demonstrators there. But why did the Military Council not attest to this order in front of the court, thus wrapping the noose around the head of the ousted president?

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Torture: A Crime Before the Revolution and After It

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The National Security Forces Have Not Fallen Yet

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Why Must SSIS Be Dissolved Now?

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Shame on the State Security

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